.
London
IPK London is a personal site, any software downloaded from here can be used but at your own risk. I accept no responsibility for any misfortune you may have.
Why DMR? DMR (Digital Mobile Radio) was originally for Business but has been adapted for use on the Amateur Bands. It is an open standard using TDMA (Time Division Multiple Access) as its mode of transmission and is fully digital throughout the transmission path, including network switches, repeaters and radio handsets. It uses what are known as two timeslots, Timeslot one will transmit for 30 milliseconds then rest for 30 milliseconds then transmit for a further 30 milliseconds and so on. But none of the voice contact is dropped in this process, you’ll still hear it as it is spoken. That will also be the same for Timeslot two, confused? Don’t be, trust me you’ll get used to it believe me, there are many video’s out there that explain the whole process. I regard DMR second in the list of Digital modes, behind C4FM but ahead of Dstar for clarity, although Dstar is certainly the busiest. There are currently two versions of DMR, these being Phoenix and Brandmeister, there is a sort of North/South divide with Phoenix being active down South and Brandmeister up North, although saying that, the new Romford repeater is Brandmeister. DMR uses a thing called a Colour Code on it’s repeaters which has absolutely nothing to do with colour whatsoever, it’s like colour code 1 or colour code 2 etc, Colour codes being like a digital CTCSS for the repeater. DMR repeaters are fairly widespread across the UK but watch out for Brandmeister of Phoenix because radio programming is that little bit different. I’ve added a working Codeplug below that covers Phoenix and Brandmeister, hope it helps, however if you should encounter any problem using it I accept no liability whatsoever (not that you should get a problem) except that the codeplug is for a TYT MD380 or Retevis RT3
Register DMR
IPK
If you use an hotspot like the Openspot there are a massive amount of Talkgroups (for want of a better word) that it is possible to use at leisure. these rooms can be an area of a country, the country itself, a special group, whatever. Using an Openspot (the one I am familiar with) you can Cross Mode DMR and Fusion rooms as they are reasonably compatible whereas DStar is entirely different, and you don’t get people changing your talkgroup halfway through a conversation just because they don’t understand the etiquet used on digital repeaters. Codeplugs for different radio’s are available by searching the Internet for radio type and area and these are really a requirement, but once these are programmed in if you have a Hotspot of your own then definately add it to that codeplug and your radio will be in optimum condition at home and outside. Building a codeplug can be time consuming and maybe even monotonous to some but the satisfaction at the end of it is incredible, and if like mine it covers most of the UK plus my Openspot then that’s awesome. Click the Red button for a list of Brandmeister Talkgroups, and that’s just the Brandmeister side of DMR.
Brandmeister
IPK London.uk
London
Why DMR? DMR (Digital Mobile Radio) was originally for Business but has been adapted for use on the Amateur Bands. It is an open standard using TDMA (Time Division Multiple Access) as its mode of transmission and is fully digital throughout the transmission path, including network switches, repeaters and radio handsets. It uses what are known as two timeslots, Timeslot one will transmit for 30 milliseconds then rest for 30 milliseconds then transmit for a further 30 milliseconds and so on. But none of the voice contact is dropped in this process, you’ll still hear it as it is spoken. That will also be the same for Timeslot two, confused? Don’t be, trust me you’ll get used to it believe me, there are many video’s out there that explain the whole process. I regard DMR second in the list of Digital modes, behind C4FM but ahead of Dstar for clarity, although Dstar is certainly the busiest. There are currently two versions of DMR, these being Phoenix and Brandmeister, there is a sort of North/South divide with Phoenix being active down South and Brandmeister up North, although saying that, the new Romford repeater is Brandmeister. DMR uses a thing called a Colour Code on it’s repeaters which has absolutely nothing to do with colour whatsoever, it’s like colour code 1 or colour code 2 etc, Colour codes being like a digital CTCSS for the repeater. DMR repeaters are fairly widespread across the UK but watch out for Brandmeister of Phoenix because radio programming is that little bit different. I’ve added a working Codeplug below that covers Phoenix and Brandmeister, hope it helps, however if you should encounter any problem using it I accept no liability whatsoever (not that you should get a problem) except that the codeplug is for a TYT MD380 or Retevis RT3
How it works.
DMR
IPK
Brandmeister
If you use a hotspot like the Openspot there is a massive amount of Talkgroups (for want of a better word) that it is possible to use at leisure. these rooms can be an area of a country, the country itself, a special group, whatever. Using an Openspot (the one I am familiar with) you can Cross Mode DMR and Fusion rooms as they are reasonably compatible whereas DStar is entirely different, and you don’t get people changing your talkgroup halfway through a conversation just because they don’t understand the etiquet used on digital repeaters. Codeplugs for different radio’s are available by searching the Internet for radio type and area and these are really a requirement, but once these are programmed in if you have a Hotspot of your own then definately add it to that codeplug and your radio will be in optimum condition at home and outside. Building a codeplug can be time consuming and maybe even monotonous to some but the satisfaction at the end of it is incredible, and if like mine it covers most of the UK plus my Openspot then that’s awesome.Click the Red button for a list of Brandmeister Talkgroups, and that’s just the Brandmeister side of DMR.
Register IPK London.uk