You need to register through your nearest DStar repeater
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London
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DStar
Dstar (Digital Smart Technologies for Amateur Radio) Dstar is possibly the most popular of the three main Digital Systems, surprising really as I find it the most tinny sounding of them all and the Forward Error Correcting (FEC) really doesn’t work terribly well, however it uses reflectors that can be quite busy at most times (Like Ref 001C). Mainly Icom radio based but also Kenwood TH D74, (pictured above) this mode was invented in Japan and fast evolved into a world wide concern. However I believe (personal opinion) possibly the hardest of the three to come to terms with in a programming sense and (at the time I did it) not the easiest to register your callsign (that mantle still goes to Fusion). However, I happen to like Dstar and there’s a lot of friendly Hams on there from all over the world, there is a Worldwide Net on a Sunday late night (UK time)
Why oh why is Dstar so complex to register with? With C4FM you just need to enter your callsign on the radio and you’re away, With DMR it is fairly straightforward too, but for some reason they decide to make Dstar just that bit more complex than it needs to be. So is the pain worth the gain? Undoubtedly yes, there are many amateurs on Dstar and at most times day or night you can find somebody to talk to. If you need to know which are the busiest reflectors at a certain time this might be of help to you, Click Here. Take a look at the Ham Radio Now video’s below, they may also be of great help, many thanks to Gary and Jeff for their filming of the event.
For Repeaters Click Here
For Registration Instructions Click Here
Newer Dstar radio’s are easier to use, in fact if you go to dstarinfo.com you can in fact download the latest repeater lists which are like Dstar Codeplugs (yes I’m sure you’ve all heard that terminology by now) Before these newer radio’s came about you had to program it manually, in fact on certain occasions nowadays you have to add new individual repeaters etc, though this is not very often it does help if you know the procedure involved so I have added this, Not the easiest thing to program. MYCALL is your own call sign, eight characters maximum.  You're allowed to add "/" and then other characters; I think the original intent was so that you could sign "/P", "/M", or "/A", but for D-STAR some people get creative, like "/BOB" for someone named Bob, or "/74" for someone using a TH-D74. URCALL can hold routing information or linking commands; to just use the local repeater, URCALL should be set to "CQCQCQ". RPT1 should be set to the local repeater and module that you're trying to access.  (The setting doesn't matter for simplex.)   RPT2 designates where you want your signal to be routed on your local repeater, normally RPT2 is set to the callsign of the local repeater followed by “G” (The setting does not matter for simplex) These days Icom and Kenwood Dstar radio’s come supplied with Dstar repeaters for many countries already on board and using the near repeater function makes getting on Dstar from the radio point of view very easy, just program your info into the radio and if you have access to a repeater you could be on Ref 001C in no time at all. However, if you own a hotspot and wish to add a new repeater to your list that’s where the programming above comes in. As I said, not the easiest radio’s in the world to program (in fact not the easiest system of the big three to understand) but by following the process it’s not impossible. If you feel it’s not going to be easy for you then I think it is best to leave it alone and get someone with knowledge of the system to do it for you.
IPK
I was looking for a radio bracket (holder) that would be fairly cheap and also easy to install in my car, bearing in mind that my dashboard is all curves, not exactly practical, then I came up with this idea, it keeps the antenna upright and also simple to use the roof antenna by putting the cable between the headrest and the seat too. Above all it’s Cheap Old Man (Amateurlogic.tv) certified lol. Works for me.
IPK London.uk
Okay so my IP has been blocked because it had lots of bad data coming from my IP. It isn't just duplicate connections but also missing headers on streams and bad sequence numbers in the data stream. Worst of all, my IP received a stream from REF001 and then sent it back to the reflector at the same time. so how could I know this? I have been trying for four months to get this block lifted but so far to no avail, DStar really isn’t my favourite mode that’s for sure, just so much Red Tape, might be designed by amateurs but not very user friendly, sorry just my opinion.
London
DSTAR
Dstar (Digital Smart Technologies for Amateur Radio) Dstar is possibly the most popular of the three main Digital Systems, surprising really as I find it the most tinny sounding of them all and the Forward Error Correcting (FEC) really doesn’t work terribly well, however it uses reflectors that can be quite busy at most times (Like Ref 001C). Mainly Icom radio based but also Kenwood TH D74, (pictured above) this mode was invented in Japan and fast evolved into a world wide concern. However I believe (personal opinion) possibly the hardest of the three to come to terms with in a programming sense and (at the time I did it) not the easiest to register your callsign (that mantle still goes to Fusion). However, I happen to like Dstar and there’s a lot of friendly Hams on there from all over the world, there is a Worldwide Net on a Sunday late night (UK time)
You need to register through your nearest DStar repeater
For Repeaters Click Here
For Registration Instructions Click Here
Why oh why is Dstar so complex to register with? With C4FM you just need to enter your callsign on the radio and you’re away, With DMR it is fairly straightforward too, but for some reason they decide to make Dstar just that bit more complex than it needs to be. So is the pain worth the gain? Undoubtedly yes, there are many amateurs on Dstar and at most times day or night you can find somebody to talk to. If you need to know which are the busiest reflectors at a certain time this might be of help to you, Click Here. Take a look at the Ham Radio Now video’s below, they may also be of great help, many thanks to Gary and Jeff for their filming of the event.
RPT2 designates where you want your signal to be routed on your local repeater, normally RPT2 is set to the callsign of the local repeater followed by “G” (The setting does not matter for simplex)
RPT1 should be set to the local repeater and module that you're trying to access.  (The setting doesn't matter for simplex.)
URCALL can hold routing information or linking commands; to just use the local repeater, URCALL should be set to "CQCQCQ".
MYCALL is your own call sign, eight characters maximum.  You're allowed to add "/" and then other characters; I think the original intent was so that you could sign "/P", "/M", or "/A", but for D-STAR some people get creative, like "/BOB" for someone named Bob, or "/74" for someone using a TH-D74.
Before these newer radio’s came about you had to program it manually, in fact on certain occasions nowadays you have to add new individual repeaters etc, though this is not very often it does help if you know the procedure involved so I have added this, Not the easiest thing to program.
Newer Dstar radio’s are easier to use, in fact if you go to dstarinfo.com you can in fact download the latest repeater lists which are like Dstar Codeplugs (yes I’m sure you’ve all heard that terminology by now)
These days Icom and Kenwood Dstar radio’s come supplied with Dstar repeaters for many countries already on board and using the near repeater function makes getting on Dstar from the radio point of view very easy, just program your info into the radio and if you have access to a repeater you could be on Ref 001C in no time at all. However, if you own a hotspot and wish to add a new repeater to your list that’s where the programming above comes in. As I said, not the easiest radio’s in the world to program (in fact not the easiest system of the big three to understand) but by following the process it’s not impossible. If you feel it’s not going to be easy for you then I think it is best to leave it alone and get someone with knowledge of the system to do it for you.
IPK
I was looking for a radio bracket (holder) that would be fairly cheap and also easy to install in my car, bearing in mind that my dashboard is all curves, not exactly practical, then I came up with this idea, it keeps the antenna upright and also simple to use the roof antenna by putting the cable between the headrest and the seat too. Above all it’s Cheap Old Man (Amateurlogic.tv) certified lol. Works for me.
IPK London.uk