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London
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Bletchley Park and the NRC
In a 1940’s Britain a Nineteenth century Mansion in a town now known as Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire a massive war effort was taking place that possibly saved thousands of lives, (on both sides) not only was this place secret to the Germans it was also a secret to the rest of the country, only the very top brass knew anything about it’s true function and they kept their mouths tightly closed. Even after it closed and the war was over Churchill ordered it to be torn apart and every single file destroyed. The best Mathmeticians in the country were brought in to De-Cyphur the German secret codes sent via the famous Enigma Machine and considering there were 159 Million, Million, Million combinations this was going to be no easy task. Then along came Alan Turing who not only broke the code he also invented a machine that could really aid in decoding maybe thousands of messages a week with his now famous Bombe machine, (below Right)
Bletchley Park
National Radio Centre
Well as it says on their website this place certainly is “A world class radio communications educational centre at Bletchley Park in Buckinghamshire” it has all the latest radiocommunications technology from Data modes like CW, FT8 etc but also now covers every single radio band. If you’re an RSGB member access to the whole site is free, that’s a saving of £20 per member but I must stress it is the Member only not their families. Looking at the centre they bring you through a lifetime of radio right up to the present day, must say I was quite impressed with the valve’s (See Below) The National Radio Centre is manned totally by RSGB volunteers and they do a fantastic job in helping people understand more about radio past and present.
If you’re not a member of the RSGB then please consider joining, believe me even joining to get free entry into Bletchley Park is well worth the subscription alone.
Take a look at their leaflet to the left, also take a look at their webpage by clicking Here You had better be prepared for a long walk if you’re fit enough, the National Radio Centre is not far from the entrance but the park is vast (if you like to visit every hut and I am sure most will) The visit for me was a real eye opener and to come into close contact with a shack that makes mine look like it’s just an empty space was fantastic. Don’t forget too that just up the road to Bletchley Park is Moonraker (No not James Bond) but Moonraker Amateur Radio Suppliers, so there’s two good reasons to take a trip (although remember that Moonraker do not open on a Saturday) If you get the chance to go then take it, I’m sure you’ll love the whole park as I did.
When I stated above that the best matmeticians were brought in o De-Cyphur the German secret codes, they also decoded Italian and Japanese too, (Japanese? thats a feat in itself I should think) Known as Station X (X being the roman numeral for Ten and this was the Tenth station) The park is a big place but there is plenty to see and plenty to learn from, also there is a rather nice cafe and gift shop too. There were lots of things I knew about Bletchley before I went but it turns out there was an awful lot I had no idea about. It seems unbelieveable how they managed to keep this place quiet during the 1939-1945 conflict, people were coming into work here daily in their hundreds but in all that time Bletchley was only bombed once, well I say once, it was in one wave, three bombs and none did any real damage, they reckon it was a lone aircraft that decided to ditch his bombs before turning back home to Germany. If you go make sure to visit the Mansion and Hut 8 (Turing’s Hut) and watch the video about the use of pigeons during the war (that’s a bit of an eye opener) good ol pigeons perhaps they’re not so bad after all.
IPK London.uk
This Documentary is well worth watching, Very informative ( I reccommend it strongly) This has to be the most In-Depth documentary of all I have seen, By Linden Stead.
London
IPK
Bletchley Park and NRC
In a 1940’s Britain a Nineteenth century Mansion in a town now known as Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire a massive war effort was taking place that possibly saved thousands of lives, (on both sides) not only was this place secret to the Germans it was also a secret to the rest of the country, only the very top brass knew anything about it’s true function and they kept their mouths tightly closed. Even after it closed and the war was over Churchill ordered it to be torn apart and every single file destroyed. The best Mathmeticians in the country were brought in to De-Cyphur the German secret codes sent via the famous Enigma Machine and considering there were 153 Million, Million, Million combinations this was going to be no easy task. Then along came Alan Turing who not only broke the code he also invented a machine that could really aid in decoding maybe thousands of messages a week with his now famous Bombe machine, (below Right)
Bletchley Park
When I stated above that the best matmeticians were brought in o De-Cyphur the German secret codes, they also decoded Italian and Japanese too, (Japanese? thats a feat in itself) Known as Station X (X being the roman numeral for Ten and this was the Tenth station) The park is a big place but there is plenty to see and plenty to learn from, also there is a rather nice cafe and gift shop. There were lots of things I knew about Bletchley before I went but it turns out there was an awful lot I had no idea about. It seems unbelieveable how they managed to keep this place quiet during the 1939-1945 conflict, people were coming into work here daily in their hundreds but in all that time Bletchley was only bombed once, well I say once, it was in one wave, three bombs and none did any real damage, they reckon it was a lone aircraft that decided to ditch his bombs before turning back home to Germany. If you go make sure to visit the Mansion and Hut 8 (Turing’s Hut) and watch the video about the use of pigeons during the war (that’s a bit of an eye opener) good ol pigeons perhaps they’re not so bad after all.
National Radio Centre
Well as it says on their website this place certainly is “A world class radio communications educational centre at Bletchley Park in Buckinghamshire” it has all the latest radiocommunications technology from Data modes like CW, FT8 etc but also now covers every single radio band. If you’re an RSGB member access to the whole site is free, that’s a saving of £20 per member but I must stress it is the Member only not their families. Looking at the centre they bring you through a lifetime of radio right up to the present day, must say I was quite impressed with the valve’s (See Below) The National Radio Centre is manned totally by RSGB volunteers and they do a fantastic job in helping people understand more about radio past and present.
If you’re not a member of the RSGB then please consider joining, believe me even joining to get free entry into Bletchley Park is well worth the subscription alone.
Take a look at their leaflet below, also take a look at their webpage by clicking Here You had better be prepared for a long walk if you’re fit enough, the National Radio Centre is not far from the entrance but the park is vast (if you like to visit every hut and I am sure most will) The visit for me was a real eye opener and to come into close contact with a shack that makes mine look like it’s just an empty space was fantastic. Don’t forget too that just up the road to Bletchley Park is Moonraker (No not James Bond) but Moonraker Amateur Radio Suppliers, so there’s two good reasons to take a trip (although remember that Moonraker do not open on a Saturday) If you get the chance to go then take it, I’m sure you’ll love the whole park as I did.
IPK London.uk
This Documentary is well worth watching, Very informative ( I reccommend it strongly) This has to be the most In- Depth documentary of all I have seen, By Linden Stead.