.
London
2E0IPK LONDON
Mainly out portable in the summer months otherwise at my
QTH VHF/UHF and DSTAR, DMR or C4FM
Welcome to the homepage of Terry 2E0IPK,I became interested in Amateur Radio about 47 years ago when I was around 14 and was given a Shortwave Radio, I took it to work when I was a messenger in London and listened to mainly Amateur stuff rather than commercial and as a fan ever since. At the age of 59 I decided it was time to get licenced, especially as at this time they had dropped Morse Code from the test. So February 23 rd  2017 I passed my Foundation and November 18 th  2017 I passed my Intermediate Licence. Plan to take the advanced? Yes, but certainly not yet, I had an enormous headache whilst taking the Intermediate. 
 PI2NOS Dutch repeater system is now available for us to use here in the UK. It is available to listen on 430.125 MHz and to transmit using an +8.5 offset, however there is no CTCSS required. If you log in to their dashboard you can see which repeater you are accessing just click here for their dashboard and to listen live. I have accessed this system several times now, mainly from my home in Dagenham but twice via my Baofeng UV5R from Dover White Cliffs, that was using great Tropospheric Ducting that day. Not sure if there are any other countries around that have repeaters we can access, it’ll certainly be fun in trying to find them, it’s fun trying to find British one’s too as the frequencies are often repeated
Do Not Use 431-432 MHz  if you are transmitting within 100 KM of Charing Cross, London. (within the circle on the map to the left) This is included within the band plan for the UK and is also covered in the foundation licence. Where I often go is just outside that area, however I still wouldn’t use more than 10W output power (My choice) especially if there’s a tropo lift on. Foundation licence holders please be aware of this information Thankyou
                Essex Skills Night            3rd Monday of the month                            Danbury
    South Essex Amateur Radio Society              2nd Tuesday of the month                           Thundersley
Established in 1954 RAIBC is a national society and charity, dedicated to supporting Radio Amateurs and shortwave listeners with disabilities. These people are there if you have a disability so give them a call or look them up on the internet. The RAIBC has a free helpline on 0800 028 8668 or visit their website at www.raibc.org.uk
IPK London is a personal site, any software downloaded from here can be used but at your own risk. I accept no responsibility for any misfortune you may have.
IPK London News Oh well there’s a thing, this website has now been accessed in South Korea, United States, India, Indonesia, China, South Africa, Germany, Japan, Vietnam, Netherlands, Spain, France, Belgium and a few others. Not bad for a little site like this, although I do try to make it as useful as I possibly can. I say to anybody here, Welcome, hope you like it thus far.
Nets in the London Area.  There are a couple of good Nets in and around the London area. Essex Ham run a net in Danbury Essex on repeater 145.725MHz (GB3DA) On a Monday evening at 8pm for a couple of hours. Also Cray Valley Net on a Sunday morning (At 10am I think) on Frequency 145.350MHz, nice bunch of people on both nets
DMR C4FM DStar
Going Digital?
DMR C4FM DStar
IPK
ICOM have another new radio on the way, the IC-705 it’s a QRP rig pushing out a maximum of 5 watts with internal ID-51 battery and 10 watts on external power and operates on all HF bands and VHF, UHF and all modes including DStar. introduced to the Japanese Hamvention recently, Watch out for it, coming soon.
London
Do Not Use 431-432 MHz  if you are transmitting within 100 KM of Charing Cross, London. (within the circle on the map to the left) This is included within the band plan for the UK and is also covered in the foundation licence. Where I often go is just outside that area, however I still wouldn’t use more than 10W output power (My choice) especially if there’s a tropo lift on. Foundation licence holders please be aware of this information Thankyou
No, the T-Shirt doesn’t say Drunk
Okay, strange things happen on amateur radio we know, and obviously we can all get into European repeaters at the time of a lift and standing on the White Cliffs at Dover obviously makes that a little easier, however I hit the Caen Repeater 150+ miles as the crow flies from  there and I am greeted by an amateur from North Dorset lol. Now okay, I am very grateful for the reply as there was no reply from any Frenchman on this occasion and we stayed on there for a few minutes (a Frenchman answered me later on the Yzengremer repeater) but it does prove a point, this is the second time this has happened to me, first time it was a contact via PI2NOS in Holland where I spoke to an amateur in Norfolk. Forget EME (Earth Moon Earth) we also have EEE (England Europe England) As I don’t use HF at the moment I keep an eye on tropo and it never ceases to amaze me, I always end up thinking wow that was strange.
Foundation Callsign Change,  the first change in licencing since I first became licenced myself. The Foundation Licence Callsign has changed from M6 to M7, it’s weird hearing M7 instead of M6, CQ CQ CQ this is M7ABC, about time too I should think people were having trouble finding callsigns that were easy to remember
DMR DMR C4FM C4FM DStar DStar
Going Digital
IPK

Welcome

Welcome to the homepage of Terry 2E0IPK I became

 interested in Amateur Radio about 48 years ago

 when I was around 14 and was given a Shortwave

 Radio, I took it to work and listened mainly to

Amateur stuff rather than commercial  and as a fan ever since. At the age of 59 I decided it was time to get licenced,  especially as at this time they had dropped Morse Code from the test. So February 23 rd  2017  I passed my Foundation and November 18 th  2017 I passed my Intermediate  Licence. Plan to take the advanced? Yes, but certainly not yet, I had an enormous headache  whilst taking the Intermediate. 
 PI2NOS Dutch repeater system is now available for us to use here in the UK. It is available to listen on 430.125 MHz and to transmit using an +8.5 offset, however there is no CTCSS required. If you log in to their dashboard you can see which repeater you are accessing just click here for their dashboard and to listen live. I have accessed this system several times now, mainly from my home in Dagenham but twice via my Baofeng UV5R from Dover White Cliffs, that was using great Tropospheric Ducting that day. Not sure if there are any other countries around that have repeaters we can access, it’ll certainly be fun in trying to find them, it’s fun trying to find British one’s too as the frequencies are often repeated
ICOM have another new radio on the way, the IC-705 it’s a QRP rig pushing out a maximum of 5 watts with internal ID-51 battery and 10 watts on external power and operates on all HF bands and VHF, UHF and all modes including DStar. introduced to the Japanese Hamvention recently, Watch out for it, coming soon.